skip content
Loading indicator

Entrez le terme de recherche

L’impératif de la décarbonisation

L’impératif de la décarbonisation

Une proposition actualisée pour aider les conseils d’administration et la direction des sociétés à élaborer, et les investisseurs à évaluer, des plans transparents et crédibles pour atteindre les objectifs de réduction nette des émissions et créer de la valeur à long terme.

Par Investissements RPC le 2 nov. 2022

Non seulement les sociétés doivent elles déterminer leur capacité de réduire lesleurs émissions de façon économique, mais aussi en faire l’une de leurs principales priorités.

L’an dernier, nous avons proposé un cadre d’évaluation de la capacité de réduction; un modèle normalisé pour évaluer le potentiel de réduction des émissions d’une société.

Dans le cadre de ces efforts, nous avons mené avec succès un projet pilote pour mettre le cadre que nous proposons à l’essai avec l’une des sociétés de notre portefeuille, ce qui a donné des résultats encourageants et informatifs.

Le cadre aide les sociétés à développer des activités fondées sur une vision à long terme, à gagner plus de parts de marché que leurs concurrents dont les émissions de carbone sont plus élevées, à prouver aux investisseurs qu’elles peuvent survivre et prospérer dans un monde sobre en carbone, à maximiser leur rendement à long terme et à accélérer la transition globale de l’économie vers les activités à zéro émission nette.

L’impératif de la décarbonisation

Une proposition actualisée pour aider les conseils d’administration et la direction des sociétés à élaborer, et les investisseurs à évaluer, des plans transparents et crédibles pour atteindre les objectifs de réduction nette des émissions et créer de la valeur à long terme.

Par Investissements RPC le 2 nov. 2022

Non seulement les sociétés doivent elles déterminer leur capacité de réduire lesleurs émissions de façon économique, mais aussi en faire l’une de leurs principales priorités.

L’an dernier, nous avons proposé un cadre d’évaluation de la capacité de réduction; un modèle normalisé pour évaluer le potentiel de réduction des émissions d’une société.

Dans le cadre de ces efforts, nous avons mené avec succès un projet pilote pour mettre le cadre que nous proposons à l’essai avec l’une des sociétés de notre portefeuille, ce qui a donné des résultats encourageants et informatifs.

Le cadre aide les sociétés à développer des activités fondées sur une vision à long terme, à gagner plus de parts de marché que leurs concurrents dont les émissions de carbone sont plus élevées, à prouver aux investisseurs qu’elles peuvent survivre et prospérer dans un monde sobre en carbone, à maximiser leur rendement à long terme et à accélérer la transition globale de l’économie vers les activités à zéro émission nette.

Jump To Report
arrow Down Button Dark
Résumé
Introduction
Votre société est-elle prête?
Le caractère essentiel d’un cadre d’évaluation des capacités de réductio...
Leçons tirées de l’application du cadre d’évaluation des capacits de réd...
Le contexte réglementaire en évolution
Le moment est venu
Annexe
With global temperatures climbing and the impacts of climate change becoming more extreme and damaging every year, the need to combat planetary warming is urgent and clear.

Equally obvious is the necessary path to effective action: emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) must be rapidly and drastically cut, with overall global emissions approaching net zero by 2050, in order to prevent potentially catastrophic impacts of climate change.

Such rapid decarbonization will require a sweeping transition, transforming every sector in every country. Industrial processes unable to decarbonize may disappear. Business models will irrevocably change across the whole economy, not just within energy systems. Renewably-produced electricity is projected to replace oil and gas as the leading energy source in cars and trucks, buildings, and industrial processes, for example. Without a dramatic reduction in the cost of carbon capture technologies that can offset emissions associated with the continued use of fossil fuels, fossil fuel reserves will become stranded and require a write down in value. At the same time, however, the need to decarbonize is already creating a myriad of new opportunities, stimulating a powerful new wave of innovation that is rapidly bringing down the costs of many low-carbon technologies, while creating new technologies and business.

Ultimately, any corporate decision can be decomposed into the company’s capacity to take action and propensity to undertake it. This is true for decarbonization. Companies need to not only identify their capacity to economically abate emissions but also put it near the top of their most urgent priorities.

As companies face the increasingly severe physical impacts of climate change, such as more extreme floods, droughts, and heatwaves, they also are under growing pressure from retail and other investors, regulators, suppliers, customers and competitors to reduce their emissions, to disclose their climate and financial risks, and to create viable plans to transition to a low-carbon economy. Making their task even harder is the fact they must grapple with technological uncertainties and the challenge of acting when data are incomplete or lacking. That lack of data is hobbling efforts to accelerate the transition to a low-carbon economy. To put data challenge in perspective, imagine a world in which only two out of five companies report their pre-tax earnings, where those that do use different definitions, and where only a fraction of them have used auditors to sign off on the data.

Until companies make detailed disclosures and develop decarbonization plans based on reliable data, investors and markets will find it difficult to accurately value companies or predict their future performance. Equally important, companies are likely to miss key opportunities to maximize long-term returns and gain competitive advantages by finding efficient transition paths ahead of the competition. Thousands of companies globally have already committed to net zero, but in many cases, it is unclear whether these companies have credible plans for achieving their commitments.

Many companies have already taken constructive action, of course, backing up their pledges to cut emissions with investments in renewable energy and other vital steps. Yet, in the CPP Investments Insights Institute’s discussions with various stakeholders, including other asset owners, asset managers, accountants, academics, consultants, and index providers, we found widespread agreement that many companies and boards of directors lack the necessary information to determine a company’s ability to transition to a low-carbon future. Some companies have made commitments to net-zero emissions without clear pathways for achieving those goals, putting them at risk for negative market reactions when investors realize the goals can’t be met. Others have yet to even create a governance framework to address the issue or assess their current GHG emissions, the essential first steps to decarbonization and sustainability according to the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD).

These failures expose companies to a number of risks, including higher energy costs, higher costs of capital, and market share losses to more climate-aware competitors. They also risk impaired future competitiveness as the transition to a low-carbon future progresses, greater potential for being burdened with stranded assets, failure to spot new business opportunities, and potential litigation if their climate guidance is discovered to have been made without appropriate basis.

To address these issues and to encourage more companies to take action, CPP Investments last year at COP26 proposed a broad Abatement Capacity Assessment Framework (‘Framework’) and standardized template for assessing a company’s potential for reducing emissions. The idea is conceptually simple. First, determine a company’s current baseline emissions. Second, identify actions that can cost-effectively cut emissions now (the current “abatement capacity”). And third, assess steps and strategies that can cost-effectively reduce emissions in the future under different carbon price assumptions (the “projected abatement capacity”).

The Framework could serve as a starting point for how companies might develop their transition plans and determine the economic feasibility of those plans. Additionally, the Framework would enable companies to comply with the sustainability reporting standards currently being developed based on recommendations from the TCFD, while also meeting the demands of shareholders and other investors for climate-related disclosures.

Since we proposed the Framework, CPP Investments has committed its portfolio and operations to being net zero by 2050. As part of that effort, we have conducted a successful pilot of the proposed Framework with one of our portfolio companies, with encouraging and informative results. We are in the process of conducting several other pilots and are currently assessing our own internal operations with the Framework. Using the convening power of the CPP Investments Insights Institute, we have also brought together roundtables of asset managers, consultants, and accountants to explore the strengths and possible limitations of the Framework.

Meanwhile, the regulatory landscape is changing. Both the United States’ Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Canadian Securities Administrations (CSA) have proposed mandatory reporting requirements for GHG emissions, emissions reductions targets, exposure to climate hazards and financial risks, and transition plans, among others. In addition, the International Sustainability Standards Boards is developing a “climate standards” that is expected to become a global baseline for reporting on climate-related issues.

This confirms the role we see for the proposed Framework. As we describe in our comments to the SEC, rather than needing to be used as a stand-alone separate exercise, the Framework can function as a complement and support to the coming regulations by offering a roadmap for the work needed to meet those regulatory requirements. In particular, the Framework provides an approach for reporting on the economic feasibility of delivering on companies’ emissions reductions commitments without giving away any competitive secrets. Supporters of the Framework also believe it can provide a convention that the market can utilize to drive fundamental changes in the economy across industries and countries, and perhaps help guide the regulations themselves. The next step is for market actors, especially capital providers, to advocate for the kind of rigor and transparency this Framework represents. As regulators put rules in place, it is in the best interest of investors and their beneficiaries that these rules provide decision-useful insights both to price risk and to ensure capital is allocated to support the transition.

Our overall message remains the same as it was in our original proposal. Climate change—and the resulting need to rapidly cut emissions and prepare for the coming transition—is an urgent issue that requires immediate attention from boards, CEOs, CSOs, and CFOs. Boards and management will need to ensure they have the necessary resources to develop and share their transition plans. This includes strengthening the company’s internal human capacity by increasing climate literacy, using the Framework to quantify the company’s decarbonization capacity, and prioritizing the removal of as much emissions as economically possible, while simultaneously developing strategies for abating those emissions that are currently more costly to abate. Failure to focus on decarbonization as a core function of management and business strategy means boards and management are not acting in the best interests of their companies, shareholders, and other stakeholders.

Developing and assessing the viability of decarbonization and transition plans should not be viewed as an onerous new exercise. Instead, companies should embrace the process as a key mechanism for identifying major opportunities and gaining competitive advantages. Assessing a company’s abatement capacity enables its management and board to better understand how it can benefit from rapidly falling costs for a wide variety of “greener” and more efficient technologies, and to accelerate the development of new low-carbon technologies. The Framework helps companies build businesses focused on the long term, gain market share over competitors with higher carbon intensities, prove to investors they can survive and thrive in a low-carbon world, maximize their own long-term returns, and help accelerate the economy-wide transition to net zero. In addition, the Framework enables companies to share the underlying assumptions for their net-zero commitments in a transparent manner without compromising commercially sensitive data.

Introduction

A year ago, the CPP Investments Insights Institute proposed a broad Abatement Capacity Assessment Framework (‘Framework’) and standardized template for companies to identify and report all sources of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in their operations and supply chains, and to calculate the economic viability of mitigating those emissions under different carbon-price scenarios. There has been strong public and private sector interest in the Framework as well as concerns raised. Over the intervening months, we have sought feedback from other institutional investors, auditors, academics, private equity general partners, and consultants to better understand those concerns and make refinements. CPP Investments is also conducting ongoing pilot assessments to prove that the approach can successfully identify major opportunities to cost-effectively reduce emissions and provide important data to boards and investors as they allocate their resources

These conversations and pilots have reinforced our belief in the need for a consistent, rigorous, and transparent way for companies to calculate and report their transition risks and more specifically, their ability to meet their net-zero goals. We thus see the Framework as a valuable addition and complement to climate disclosure rules that have recently been proposed by national financial regulatory bodies—and we strongly urge company boards and top executives to use emissions reductions assessments as a core part of their business strategy. Further, we believe that as regulatory frameworks come into focus, market actors, especially capital providers, should advocate for the kind of rigor and transparency this framework represents. As regulators put rules in place, it is in the best interest of investors and their beneficiaries that the transition to a green economy be guided by clear metrics. Our Abatement Capacity Assessment Framework offers a mechanism to develop and present those metrics.

Time for a wake-up call: The whole economy transition to net zero is underway. Is your company ready?

It’s hard to overstate both the urgency of the need to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions—and the sweeping changes that such a transition will bring.

The planet has already warmed more than 1°C since pre-industrial days and, without rapid and substantial cuts in emissions of heat-trapping gases, is set to climb to 1.5°C of warming between 2030 and 2052, with potentially catastrophic consequences. Each year, the toll from the impacts of climate change, such as more severe storms and floods, and searing heatwaves and droughts, adds up to billions of dollars and incalculable human suffering. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) we have three years before it is crucial to reach the peak in global GHG emissions and start a rapid decline to limit warming to around 1.5°C (2.7°F). As a result, CEOs should already be planning now for the coming low-carbon global economy.

There’s also no mystery about what needs to be done. Report after report, from organizations like the International Renewable Energy Agency and the Risky Business Project, show that successful decarbonization of the energy system rests on three pillars: electrify everything possible, from transportation to heating and cooling systems in buildings. Produce that electricity from renewable sources, like wind, solar, hydro, and geothermal. And dramatically boost energy efficiency. Viable strategies are also being proposed for sectors and industries that are hard to electrify directly, such as steelmaking, chemicals, cement, and shipping. For those, fuels or feedstocks like hydrogen or ammonia could be produced from renewable electricity, or hydrocarbons could still play important roles if accompanied by carbon capture technologies. In addition, low carbon strategies must be adopted in food systems and other sectors.

Governments around the world have recognized the need to decarbonize and continue to align their economies to net zero through Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). As a result, companies operating in this landscape will increasingly be required to decarbonize. Against this backdrop, we believe that boards have a responsibility to see that management teams have appropriately considered and integrated a strategy to decarbonize their business. The abatement capacity assessment allows boards to better understand the levers available to a company to decarbonize and measure progress against them—while avoiding a collision course with future regulation.

As the world transitions to net zero, we believe there will be investment opportunities across sectors, asset classes, and geographies. Those opportunities are likely to come from industry leaders that drive carbon reduction innovations and practices. For example, today’s engine block or fuel injector manufacturers will become tomorrow’s equivalent of buggy whip makers from a century ago, unless they can use their technical expertise to transition to producing electric motors, chargers, or other green economy essentials. Gas-fired boilers will experience plummeting market shares, as they are overtaken by efficient heat pumps. Similarly, there could be declines in a wide variety of factories and facilities supplying the fossil-fuel-based economy. Meanwhile, the value of suppliers of the indispensable components for the coming low-carbon economy, such as materials for batteries, will likely climb.

CPP Investments’ role in the whole economy transition is to fund emissions reductions—investing to deliver returns while supporting the decarbonization of the real economy. We believe that companies driving and demonstrating carbon reduction innovations and practices will generate maximized returns, from increased efficiency and renewable energy to carbon capture and storage technologies, sustainable food, real estate, and transportation. These are companies that are not only supporting their own transitions but also those of the value chains of which they are a part. CPP Investments is catalyzing these transitions by investing in companies at varying stages of the decarbonization spectrum. Through incentivization and capitalization, the Fund’s decarbonization investment approach enhances value to the Fund and transforms businesses.

Navigating this far-reaching transition will be a huge challenge for companies—and their investors. Companies may need to adjust or even exit some businesses and enter new ones, phase out product lines, invest in new technologies, depreciate some assets faster, revamp supply chains, or even relocate facilities closer to sources of renewably-produced energy or low-carbon fuels. The transition will also be a challenge for capital providers. To funnel capital to the highest-return opportunities, investors need a way to assess which companies can profitably mitigate emissions by upgrading to new technologies and fuel sources—and which are incapable of cutting their emissions under any foreseeable scenario.

Yet roundtable discussions, convened by the CPP Investments Insights Institute with asset managers, accountants, and consultants, found that many companies lag in understanding and planning for these changes. As one consultant said: “A lot of sectors are going to fundamentally change. But a lot of companies don’t understand the system shifts.”

In fairness, predicting the future is notoriously difficult, especially during major transitions. The lessons from the past are that many innovations and new technologies—and their impacts—are completely unexpected, and that costs typically decline much faster than originally estimated. In fact, even the most optimistic recent predictions for price drops and investment growth in green technologies like solar PV, wind energy, and battery storage have significantly underestimated the actual pace of change. It’s not surprising then that “companies may not see coming declines in costs, so they do not make possible emissions reductions,” as one consultant told CPP Investments.

Why an Abatement Capacity Assessment Framework is essential

In February 2022, CPP Investments committed its portfolio and operations to being net zero of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across all scopes by 2050.

The commitment is made on the basis and with the expectation that the global community’s ability to achieve net-zero is contingent on several advancements. These advancements include the acceleration and fulfilment of commitments made by governments, technological progress, fulfilment of corporate targets, changes in consumer and corporate behaviours, and development of global reporting standards and carbon markets, all of which will be necessary for us to meet our commitment.

While cutting emissions and creating transition plans are difficult tasks, our discussions with asset owners and asset managers (representing a total of over US$18 trillion in assets under management) as well as accountants and consultants show that the majority of companies and their boards of directors have yet to begin grappling with the challenge. As a result, they are putting their companies at risk. They often fail to see the urgency of decarbonization.

In addition, while some companies have made commitments to net-zero emissions, they have done so without clear pathways for achieving those goals. One recent study analyzed sustainability reports and other publicly available documents from 25 prominent businesses that have set net-zero targets. The analysis showed that the plans these companies have in place would actually achieve emissions cuts of only 40%, not 100%. The failure of these companies to back up their commitments with assurable emissions-reductions paths puts them at risk of negative market reactions when the targets are not met. The sustainability-related setbacks companies can experience today highlight the importance of open dialogue and strong partnership. The type of partnership where capital providers are willing and able to take the long-view, and actively create an environment where solutions can take shape in businesses.

We believe the Framework provides one such solution. It is a mechanism for helping companies take the first steps in assessing their capacity for reducing emissions. It also provides important incentives for developing both decarbonization technologies and rigorous methods to ensure the quality of carbon capture projects.

The Framework is analogous to mapping a trip with GPS. It showcases the “routes” to decarbonization, the shortcuts for reaching the destination (by highlighting the most efficient actions and sequence) as well as the tolls and fees along the way (by showing the tradeoffs between speed and costs). It also lets others, such as investors, track progress along the route. This is a different benefit from the Science Based Targets Initiative’s (SBTI) Target Validation Protocol. The SBTI protocol validates the destination, rather than actually charting the route for getting there. While both approaches are important, the purpose of the Framework is to provide actionable guidance at a company level for which actions to take, in which order.

The Framework has three basic steps (for more details and template, please see Appendix):

01

Determine the Current (Proven) Projected Abatement Capacity.

When assessing its capacity to abate GHG emissions, the critical first step for a company is tallying up its current emissions and estimating how much of those emissions are economic to abate (see box for definition) with currently available, proven technologies.

For example, a cement plant may be able to eliminate 100% of emissions associated with its electricity consumption by switching to renewable electricity, but most of the emissions from its kilns can’t be reduced cost-effectively with available technologies that are economic today. The analysis would cover both direct emissions from company operations and assets (so-called Scope 1 emissions) and emissions from the generation of energy the company uses (Scope 2). Similar abatement capacity assessments could be done for other aspects of a company’s operations (including business travel), suppliers, and customers (Scope 3), resulting in an auditable metric that sums up its current capacity to abate. Scope 3 emissions are the most challenging for companies to assess since their inclusion would require suppliers and customers to provide abatement capacity assessments for their own Scope 1 & 2 emissions. The is especially challenging across complex supply chains. Methods for assessing Scope 3 emissions, while avoiding double counting and ensuring the integrity of the data, are still embryonic. Until this is resolved, we believe companies should focus on assessing their Scope 1 and 2 emissions.

Definition of “economic to abate”

There are several methods of determining if investments in emissions reductions are economic now. Our Abatement Capacity Assessment Framework uses the standard concept of “net present value.” Emissions are economic to abate if all costs (including capital, fuel, and operations and maintenance costs) are less than total revenues over the lifetime of the investment. A typical discount rate might be 5-10% (allowing companies to easily compare rates of return for emissions reductions with possible new investments elsewhere), but more important than the actual number is making it transparent. Some efficiency measures can bring particularly high returns, since capital outlays can be small, while uses that require storage to overcome intermittency are often much less economic..

02

Assess the Long-term (Probable) Projected Abatement Capacity.

The large uncertainties associated with technology costs, the pace of innovation, regulatory regimes, and carbon prices make it difficult to standardize methods of assessing future abatement capacity. To cope with this complexity, we propose that companies assume no change to today’s technology costs and regulations, but use standardized carbon prices that are higher than current levels. Our original Framework used US$75 and US$150 per tCO₂e to create two scenarios for determining future abatement capacity. To be meaningful in making real world decisions, the price of carbon in the initial assessment needs to be above the current highest spot price, which reached €99/tCO₂e in the European Union in early August. So, we are updating the carbon price in this Framework to be US$100 and US$150 per tCO₂e. The US$100 per tCo2e carbon price allows companies to report their incremental capacity to abate over the spot price. Meanwhile, a price of US$150/tCO₂e is widely seen as needed to create large enough incentives to decarbonize the whole global economy. The use of a carbon price of US$150/tCO₂e, which currently may seem high, could provide additional visibility on the ability of companies to further abate their emissions. However, in addition to these carbon prices, companies could also consider using internal shadow prices that they would select based on their own unique situations.

The calculated economic abatement capacities using these carbon prices would be subject to revision as regulations advance or technology costs fall. As a result, this future abatement capacity assessment would need to be done periodically, ideally annually.

03

Determine the Uneconomic Projected Abatement Capacity.

CPP Investments believes that the Abatement Capacity Assessment Framework will enable companies to identify major opportunities to cut emissions. Some may even find that the emissions can be cost-effectively brought all the way down to net zero at various prices of carbon. However, others will find that some emissions are uneconomic, or even technologically impossible, to eliminate. Those residual emissions could then be reported along with management’s assumptions on how they will eventually address the issues. Possible strategies could include the managed decline, or shuttering of business activities (such as closing coal mines), relying on further technology development (such as synthetic fuels) or purchasing high quality, permanent removal approaches.

Lessons from Applying the Framework

To determine the feasibility of the Framework and encourage its broader implementation, CPP Investments is testing its use with select holding companies in our active portfolio and in our own operations.
The Framework plays an important role in the Fund’s newly established decarbonization investment approach. This unique approach focuses on financing emissions reduction and partnering with select high emitters to spur meaningful and necessary progress to net zero in the real economy, and in doing so extract the value presented by the transition. The Framework is one of the tools that the Fund will use to employ and scale this approach.
The first pilot assessment was conducted on the Trafford Centre, a shopping center on the outskirts of Manchester, U.K., that has foot traffic of more than 35 million visits a year. The largest mall in the U.K. when it opened in 1998, the Trafford Centre went through several changes in ownership before being acquired by CPP Investments’ Real Assets Credit (RAC) Group in December 2020. It is now part of our Real Estate portfolio.

Hear more from Fraser Pearce, the Trafford Centre’s independent board chair, about the board’s experience utilizing the Framework to help inform the company’s path to net zero.

The Framework helped provide management with the Centre’s baseline emissions. The data revealed significant opportunities to cost-effectively reduce the majority of the Centre’s emissions, with a big chunk coming at a surprisingly low cost (see box). The exercise also charted possible pathways to reducing the remaining emissions and achieving net zero. CPP Investments has provided a description of this case study for inclusion to the 2022 Task Force on Climate-related Disclosures Status Report.

The next five pilots of the Fund’s decarbonization investment approach (employing this Framework) were still ongoing when this report was finalized. These pilots are expected to make the respective companies more competitive as the global whole economy transition proceeds towards a net-zero economy.

Trafford Centre Pilot
The Trafford Centre is a large shopping center on the outskirts of Manchester in the U.K. It has an unusual Rococo and Baroque design, with three domed glass ceilings and broad expanses of marble and granite floors punctuated with classical statues. It contains more than 150 stores and scores of restaurants, cafes, and bars. Visitors can even ski, skydive, and golf.

Wholly owned by CPP Investments, the Centre offered an ideal site for first pilot of the Framework. Management was particularly enthusiastic about the exercise because they firmly believed that making the shopping center “greener” would offer an important competitive advantage in attracting both customers and tenants.

In ten weeks, a team with deep understanding of the business not only tallied up the Centre’s greenhouse emissions for the first time, it also determined that more than two-thirds of those emissions could be eliminated cost effectively. Elimination of about 5% of the overall emissions was already baked into the Centre’s existing £10 million capital improvement plan, which included installing more efficient lighting and replacing old equipment and elevators. The next finding was that another 15% could be immediately achieved at a cost of only £500,000 with smart lighting controls and solar PV systems, representing opportunities to reduce emissions with a minimal additional capital outlay. A further 44% of the reductions would come from the expected decarbonization of the electricity grid supplying the Centre. Eliminating the remaining emissions could be done by shading the glass ceilings, replacing gas furnaces with heat pumps, and other measures, the analysis found, but none of those are currently economically viable.

Utilizing the Framework helped to provide the Trafford Centre’s board with the confidence to commit to becoming net zero in its own operations by 2030. This would be achieved by utilizing existing economically viable measures to reduce emissions by 64%, with the remainder being mitigated through verifiable carbon offsets. While 100% of Scopes 1 and 2 emissions from the Trafford Centre can be abated based on technological measures that exist today, not all of these measures are currently economically viable. The company also is committed to supporting tenants and customers on their decarbonization pathways by providing tenants with the information they need about the decarbonization of shared spaces. Trafford’s plans include providing renewable energy through on-site generation, developing market-leading EV charging capabilities, encouraging employees to switch to low-carbon transportation, continuing to work towards zero waste to landfill, utilizing market-leading Green Leases, and more. Trafford management says the Framework provided a starting point from which the company can now chart its path to net zero. In addition, it gives investors crucial details on how much that path will cost—without revealing any competitive secrets. See Table 1 & 2.

So far, the biggest lesson from the pilots is the high value the exercise offers to boards and management teams in identifying opportunities that otherwise might have been missed. Those opportunities extend beyond finding viable options for reducing emissions to include identification of strategies to cut costs, and gain market share and investor support, while becoming a leader, rather than a follower, in tomorrow’s low-carbon economy. For investors, these pilots show that the Abatement Capacity Assessment Framework can provide crucial guidance about the long-term viability of companies.

The pilots also highlight the importance of periodically updating abatement capacity assessments. Technologies and associated costs are changing so rapidly that the results will change over time, sometimes dramatically. Declining costs for both renewable energy and electrolyzers, which use electricity to split water into oxygen and hydrogen, for example, could drive down the costs of “green” hydrogen to an inflection point, where it suddenly becomes a cost-effective substitute for hydrocarbon fuels and feedstocks in heavy industry, shipping, and aviation, and even in agriculture (in the form of “green” ammonia). For any given company, “by the time 2030 rolls around, a lot more of the emissions reductions will be economic,” says one consultant.

Because of the many benefits of periodic abatement capacity assessments, CPP Investments is aiming to have the approach widely adopted by companies in our portfolio that haven’t yet developed credible transition plans. To help reach that goal, we are making internal and external experts available to select portfolio companies to perform the initial assessments. The expectation is that companies will build their own in-house expertise to conduct these assessments over time. In addition, our work so far has identified considerably more consultants than originally expected that have the interest and capacity to help companies as they perform such abatement capacity assessments. The resulting competition is expected to put downward pressure on prices.

The Developing Regulatory Context

When CPP Investments first proposed the Framework, the reporting of emissions reductions and targets was strictly voluntary.
More than 3,600 companies and organizations around the world have endorsed voluntary guidelines from the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (which CPP Investments helped shape as a founding member and one of only two pension funds represented on the TCFD). The value of the work of the TCFD and its recommendations has become increasingly clear to the market, with nearly 900 companies and other organizations that have chosen to become supporters since the TCFD released its 2021 Status Report. Our Framework offered a new complementary approach.

Now, however, the regulatory landscape is changing. On October 18, 2021, the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) proposed mandatory rules for climate-related disclosures. The policy would require companies to report short-, medium- and long-term climate-related risks and opportunities, along with their impacts on business operations, strategies, and financial planning. Companies would also have to disclose their greenhouse gas emissions (Scope 1, 2, and 3) or explain why those emissions can’t be reported.

On March 21, 2022, the United States’ Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) proposed even more detailed mandatory rules. In addition to requiring reporting on emissions, risks from physical climate-related hazards, and risks from the ongoing transition, the proposed SEC rules would require disclosure of emissions reduction targets and plans to achieve those targets. The United Kingdom, New Zealand, Japan, Hong Kong, and the European Union are all moving ahead with similar measures. In addition, the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) has set up the International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB) with the same Governance as the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). Just as the IASB provides a global baseline for financial reporting, the ISSB will provide a global baseline for reporting sustainability-related information. Its first standard, on climate, is expected by the end of 2022.

All of these regulations have yet to be finalized. But the proposed rules help accomplish what CPP Investments has long been advocating—getting the full attention of boards of directors and top levels of management about the urgency of decarbonization and energy transition plans. As one consultant told CPP Investments: “The SEC’s proposed rules are a wake-up call to CFOs.”

The changing regulatory environment confirms the role we see for the Abatement Capacity Assessment Framework. Rather than being a stand-alone separate exercise, it can function more effectively as a complement to the recommendations of the TCFD and the expected upcoming regulations, which is why it is featured in the TCFD 2022 Status Report. “This can’t be a separate idea—it has to be framed in a way to meet the requirements,” one consultant explained. CPP Investments believes the Framework can do just that, offering a roadmap to the foundational work needed to meet regulatory requirements and guard portfolios against undue risk. It also provides an approach for reporting on the economic feasibility of meeting the net-zero commitments so many companies have made, something the market currently has no convention for. Used as a standardized procedure, it allows comparisons across companies, and geographies, which is crucial for investors. Inconsistent accounting methodologies among countries can present barriers to international capital mobility. If enough companies adopt the Framework, we believe it can drive fundamental changes in the economy across industries and countries, and perhaps help guide the final regulations themselves. MSCI clearly agrees with us as evidenced by the inclusion of the Framework in its product offerings.

The Time is Now

CPP Investments believes now is the moment for boards of directors and top executives to embrace emissions reductions assessments and transition planning, not as another regulatory requirement, but as a core part of management strategy. As our pilot assessments demonstrate, the benefits of assessing and implementing transition plans can be real and substantial. The transition to a low-carbon future is accelerating. Companies cannot afford to be left behind and investors should not take the risk.

We’d love to hear about your experience implementing the Abatement Capacity Assessment Framework. To share your story, contact us at insightsinstitute@cppib.com

Appendix

Abatement Capacity Assessment: A Template for Reporting Projected Abatement Capacity (PAC)
The goal of this template is to help companies create an actionable roadmap for navigating the transition to net-zero GHG emissions in a consistent manner. The roadmap will help identify specific efficiency initiatives, technology upgrades, and shifts from fossil fuel power and feedstocks to renewables. See more detailed descriptions of these terms in the footnotes below.

We expect that a company’s abatement capacity would be reported for both Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions, and eventually for Scope 3 emissions. That capacity would be assessed under both the current state of business and under different carbon price assumptions. We acknowledge that reporting Scope 3 is challenging and might take time, since it depends on suppliers and customers reporting their own Scope 1 and 2 Projected Abatement Capacities (PAC), and therefore recommend focusing first on Scopes 1 and 2.

For some companies, current PACs will cover substantially all emissions. But we recognize that many sectors face considerable decarbonization challenges, and for them, much of their current emissions will be deemed Uneconomic to Abate. In this category, we hope to see sub-assessments addressing a continuum of potential transition options, including business segment closures, future transformational technologies on which the company is conducting due diligence, and where unavoidable, the use of high-quality, permanent removal offsets.

Abatement Capacity Assessment: A template for reporting Projected Abatement Capacity

The goal of this template is to aid companies in creating an actionable roadmap for navigating the wider transition to net-zero GHG emissions in a consistent manner as it relates to efficiency initiatives, technology upgrades and a shift from thermally generated power to renewables. See more detailed descriptions of these terms in the footnotes below.

Over time a company’s abatement capacity would ideally be reported across Scopes 1, 2 and 3 vis à vis its current state of business and under different carbon price assumptions. We acknowledge that reporting Scope 3 might require a period of time as it is dependent on suppliers and customers reporting their own Scope 1 and 2 Projected Abatement Capacity (PAC).

For some companies, current PAC will cover substantially all emissions. But we recognize that many sectors face considerable decarbonization challenges, and for them, much of their current emissions will be deemed Uneconomic to Abate. In this category, we hope to see sub-assessments addressing a continuum of potential transition options including business segment closures, future transformational technologies on which the company is conducting due diligence, and where unavoidable, the use of high-quality, permanent removal offsets.

Note: The percentage in the chart above are rounded. To address the consistency and comparability of this Framework, all capacity assessments must be reported as regionally relevant — i.e., the metrics reported are required to account for regional regulation, costs, subsidies, carbon prices, etc.
Gt = Scope 1 + Scope 2 + Scope 3 GHG emissions. To the extent that companies are not yet able to report all three, there exists the ability to start reporting Scope 1 and 2. Many of these data are already reported via CDP and company fillings. Adding Scope 3 data when suppliers and customers report their Scope 1 and 2.
Et = Percentage of Gt projected to be addressable by “Efficiency” initiatives (e.g., stopping methane leaks, building management, using shore power, behavioral change, etc.)
It = Percentage of Gt projected to be addressable by “Investment” in abatement solutions that are economic at current costs, carbon prices and prevailing regulation (e.g., switching to electric vehicles, heat pumps, retrofitting, etc.)
Rt = Percentage of Gt projected to be addressable via a shift to “Renewables” for power generation (i.e., likely to be addressed by greening of the grid). many companies already report indirect emissions from electricity consumption, so some of this data is already available.
Ct = Et + It + Rt = “Current Projected Abatement Capacity” to abate Gt. We expect the reporting convention would default to reporting this as a % of total emissions (i.e., in the example above, the company’s Current Projected Abatement Capacity is 71%).
EC75-t = Percentage of Gt projected to be “Economic to abate at US$75/tCO2e” carbon price. This would allow the company to apply a higher carbon price to current technology costs and regulation to determine the incremental % of abatement that would become economic at this standad carbon price assumption.
EC150-t = Percentage of Gt projected to be “Economic to abate at US$150/tCO2e” carbon price. As above, but for a higher carbon price.
Lt = EC75-t + EC150t = “Long-term Projected Abatement Capacity” attributable to solutions that would become economic at pre-determined future Carbon Prices that are well within the bounds of those deemed necessary to support a ner-zero outcome.
While Current and Long-term Projected Abatement Capacity should be reported independently we expect that market convention would add the two to sum “Projected Abatement Capacity” and refer to that as a percentage of total emissions (i.e., in the example above, the company’s PAC is 91%).
Ut = At + Tt + Ot = Currently “Uneconomic Projected Abatement Capacity”. The percentage of Gt that would require the “Abandonment/Closure of Assets,” deployment of “Transformative Technology,” “Offsetting” using removal credits. This is the residual Gt not projected to be addressable by Ct + Lt and would require closure, innovation in transformative technologies or removal via permanent verifiable solutions.

Richard Manley

Managing Director, Head of Sustainable Investing, Global Leadership Team, CPP Investments

Prior to joining CPP Investments in 2019, Richard spent 18 years at Goldman Sachs, where he was most recently Global Head of Thematic Equity and ESG Research, and Co-Head of EMEA Equity Research. Previously, he worked at Merrill Lynch, Donaldson, Lufkin and Jenrette, and Paribas Capital Markets as an Integrated Oil & Gas equity analyst. Richard holds a Graduado Superior/BA (Hons) in European Business Administration from ICADE in Madrid.

Read an op-ed from Richard Manley on why committing to net zero is like running a two hour marathon.

Tim Barlow

Managing Director, Real Estate, Real Assets,
CPP Investments

Tim is a Managing Director in the Sustainable Investing team responsible for real estate. Prior to 2022, Tim was a Managing Director in CPPIB’s real estate equity team, responsible for origination and portfolio management across Continental Europe (ex. Germany and CEE). Prior to CPPIB, Tim worked at Grosvenor both on their London Estate and Fund Management business, based in Paris. Tim holds a BSc (Hons) from Edinburgh University and a MSc is Real Estate Finance from the University of Reading. Tim is also a Member of the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors.

Katrina Beechey

Managing Director, Portfolio Value Creation, Real Assets, CPP Investments

Prior to joining CPP Investments Katrina was Senior Vice President Transformation at Burberry and Principal at Bain & Co., London. She has extensive experience in the retail sector having worked in brands, retailers and real estate. Previously, she worked at Christies and Monitor Deloitte. Katrina holds an MA (Honors) from Cambridge University for History of Art.

A special thanks to the following individuals for their contributions to this report:

Professor Robert Gibson, Hong Kong University
Vinay Shandal, Managing Director and Partner, Boston Consulting Group
Tim Smith, Research Analyst, Climate Change & Energy Transition, Lazard
Fraser Pierce, Independent Board Chair, Trafford Centre

icon Arrow Down Blue Loop

Résumé

Compte tenu de la hausse des températures dans le monde entier et du fait que les effets des changements climatiques deviennent, chaque année, de plus en plus extrêmes, le besoin de lutter contre le réchauffement de la planète est aussi urgent qu’évident. Pour prévenir les effets potentiellement catastrophiques des changements climatiques, nous devons réduire les émissions de dioxyde de carbone et d’autres gaz à effet de serre (GES) de façon rapide et radicale afin de nous rapprocher, à l’échelle mondiale, de zéro émission nette d’ici 2050.

Cette décarbonisation rapide nécessitera des changements radicaux qui transformeront tous les secteurs, dans tous les pays. Les processus industriels qui ne peuvent être décarbonisés pourraient disparaître. Les modèles d’affaires évolueront dans l’ensemble de l’économie, et pas seulement dans le domaine des systèmes énergétiques. Tout, qu’il s’agisse de procédés industriels, de bâtiments, de transport, d’aliments ou de biens de consommation, sera touché. Si le coût des technologies de captage du carbone pouvant compenser les émissions de GES ne diminue pas énormément, les réserves de carburants fossiles seront abandonnées et il faudra réduire leur valeur. Parallèlement, la nécessité de décarboniser crée déjà une myriade de nouvelles possibilités en suscitant une puissante nouvelle vague d’innovation qui fait rapidement diminuer les coûts de nombreuses technologies sobres en carbone tout en donnant naissance à de nouvelles technologies et à de nouvelles occasions d’affaires.

Il n’est pas suffisant pour les sociétés de déterminer leur capacité à réduire leurs émissions sur le plan économique. Cela doit faire partie de leurs principales priorités.

Les sociétés sont confrontées aux mêmes répercussions physiques de plus en plus sérieuses des changements climatiques comme l’intensification des inondations, des sécheresses et des vagues de chaleur que leurs parties prenantes. De plus, elles sont confrontées à des pressions croissantes de la part d’investisseurs, individuels ou non, d’organismes de réglementation, de leurs fournisseurs, de leurs clients et de leurs concurrents qui les poussent à réduire leurs émissions, à divulguer les risques climatiques et financiers liés à leurs activités et à créer des plans viables pour la transition vers une économie sobre en carbone. Ils sont aux prises avec des incertitudes technologiques, y compris les changements futurs à la réglementation, les prix du carbone et le coût des technologies de remplacement, et la difficulté d’agir lorsque les données sont incomplètes ou manquantes. Ce manque de données entrave les efforts visant à accélérer la transition vers une économie sobre en carbone.

Tant que les sociétés ne fourniront pas d’information détaillée et n’élaboreront pas de plans de décarbonisation fondés sur des données fiables, les investisseurs et les marchés auront du mal à évaluer les sociétés avec précision et à prévoir leur rendement futur. Fait tout aussi important, les sociétés qui n’ont pas de plan de décarbonisation sont susceptibles de rater d’importantes occasions de maximiser leurs rendements à long terme et d’obtenir des avantages concurrentiels en trouvant des voies de transition efficaces avant leurs concurrents. Des milliers de sociétés du monde entier se sont déjà engagées à atteindre un bilan de zéro émission nette, mais dans de nombreux cas, il est difficile de déterminer si ces sociétés ont des plans crédibles pour respecter leurs engagements.

De nombreuses sociétés ont déjà pris des mesures constructives, confirmant leurs promesses de réduire leurs émissions par des investissements dans les énergies renouvelables, des réductions des émissions liées aux activités, et d’autres mesures essentielles. Lors de récentes discussions de l’Institut sur les données d’Investissements RPC, qui a réuni d’autres propriétaires d’actifs, gestionnaires d’actifs, comptables, universitaires, consultants et fournisseurs d’indices, nous avons constaté un consensus généralisé sur une question fondamentale : l’information disponible est insuffisante pour déterminer la capacité de la plupart des sociétés à faire la transition vers un avenir sobre en carbone.

Certaines sociétés se sont engagées à atteindre zéro émission nette sans établir de plan clair pour atteindre cet objectif, ce qui les expose à des réactions négatives du marché lorsque les investisseurs se rendront compte que l’objectif est impossible à atteindre. D’autres n’ont même pas encore créé de cadre de gouvernance pour aborder la question ou évaluer leurs émissions de GES actuelles, ce qui constitue les premières étapes essentielles de la décarbonisation et de la durabilité selon le Groupe de travail sur l’information financière relative aux changements climatiques (GIFCC).

Ces échecs exposent les sociétés concernées à un certain nombre de risques, dont la hausse des coûts de l’énergie, la hausse des coûts des capitaux et la perte de parts de marché en faveur de concurrents plus sensibles au climat. Elles risquent également de devenir moins concurrentielles au fil de la transition vers un avenir sobre en carbone et sont plus susceptibles de se retrouver plombées par des actifs échoués, d’être incapables de trouver de nouvelles occasions d’affaires et de faire face à d’éventuels litiges si l’on découvre qu’elles ont établi leurs prévisions climatiques sans fondement approprié.

Afin de régler ces problèmes et d’encourager un plus grand nombre de sociétés à prendre des mesures, Investissements RPC a proposé un cadre général d’évaluation des capacités de réduction (le « cadre ») et un modèle normalisé pour évaluer le potentiel de réduction des émissions des sociétés. L’idée est simple sur le plan conceptuel. Premièrement, déterminer quelles sont les émissions de base actuelles d’une société. Deuxièmement, trouver des mesures qui permettraient de réduire les émissions de façon rentable dès maintenant (la « capacité de réduction » actuelle). Troisièmement, évaluer les mesures et les stratégies qui permettraient de réduire les émissions de façon rentable à l’avenir en fonction de différentes hypothèses relatives au prix du carbone (la « capacité de réduction prévue »).

Le cadre vise à servir de point de départ pour l’élaboration de plans de transition et la détermination de leur faisabilité économique. Il permettrait également aux sociétés de se conformer aux normes de présentation de l’information sur la durabilité qui sont en cours d’élaboration en fonction des recommandations du GIFCC, tout en répondant aux exigences des actionnaires et d’autres investisseurs en matière d’information relative aux changements climatiques.

Depuis que nous avons proposé le cadre, nous avons mené un projet pilote fructueux avec l’une de nos sociétés en portefeuille, qui a produit des résultats encourageants et informatifs. Le pouvoir rassembleur de l’Institut sur les données d’Investissements RPC nous a également permis de réunir des gestionnaires d’actifs, des consultants et des comptables pour examiner les forces et les éventuelles limites du cadre. Nous sommes en train de mener plusieurs autres projets pilotes et d’évaluer nos propres activités internes à l’aide du Cadre, dans le cadre de notre engagement à ramener notre portefeuille et nos activités à zéro d’ici 2050.

Pendant ce temps, la réglementation évolue. La Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) des États-Unis et les Autorités canadiennes en valeurs mobilières (ACVM) ont proposé des exigences en matière de présentation de l’information relative aux émissions de GES, aux cibles de réduction des émissions, à l’exposition aux risques climatiques et financiers et aux plans de transition. De plus, l’International Sustainability Standards Board élabore des normes climatiques qui devraient devenir une référence mondiale pour la présentation de l’information relative aux enjeux liés au climat.

Cela confirme notre façon de voir le rôle du cadre que nous proposons. En June 2022, nous avons fourni des commentaires à la SEC en réponse à ses propositions de règles visant à améliorer et à normaliser les informations relatives au climat à l’intention des investisseurs. Dans nos commentaires, nous indiquons que plutôt que de constituer une activité distincte, le cadre pourrait compléter et soutenir la future réglementation en servant de feuille de route pour déterminer quel est le travail nécessaire pour répondre aux exigences. Pour être plus précis, le cadre offre aux sociétés une approche pour rendre compte de la faisabilité économique de leurs engagements en matière de réduction des émissions sans révéler de secrets concurrentiels. Les partisans du cadre considèrent également qu’il pourrait jouer, au sein du marché, un rôle de convention à suivre pour susciter des changements économiques fondamentaux à l’échelle des secteurs et des pays, et peut-être même contribuer à orienter la réglementation elle-même. Nous croyons que les acteurs du marché, en particulier les investisseurs, voudront plaider en faveur du type de rigueur et de transparence que représente le cadre. À mesure que les organismes de réglementation mettent des règles en place, les investisseurs et leurs bénéficiaires ont intérêt à ce que celles-ci fournissent des renseignements utiles à la prise de décisions, aussi bien pour évaluer le risque que pour veiller à ce que l’on affecte des capitaux à la transition.

Notre message global demeure le même que celui de notre rapport initial « L’avenir des rapports sur la transition climatique ». Les changements climatiques et les besoins de réduire rapidement les émissions et de se préparer à la transition à venir qui en découlent constituent un problème urgent qui nécessite l’attention immédiate des conseils d’administration et des cadres supérieurs des sociétés. Ils devront s’assurer d’avoir les ressources nécessaires pour élaborer et diffuser leurs plans de transition. Cela comprend l’amélioration de leurs connaissances sur le climat, en utilisant le cadre pour quantifier la capacité de décarbonisation des sociétés et en accordant la priorité à l’élimination des émissions autant que possible sur le plan économique, tout en élaborant des stratégies pour réduire les émissions qui coûtent actuellement le plus cher à réduire. S’ils omettent de se concentrer sur la décarbonisation en tant que fonction de base de la direction et de la stratégie d’affaires, les conseils d’administration et les directions des sociétés n’agissent ni dans leur intérêt ni dans celui de leurs actionnaires et des autres parties prenantes.

L’élaboration de plans de décarbonisation et de transition et l’évaluation de leur viabilité ne devraient pas être considérées comme un nouvel exercice coûteux. Les sociétés devraient plutôt voir ce processus comme un mécanisme clé pour repérer d’importantes occasions et gagner des avantages concurrentiels. L’évaluation de la capacité de réduction des émissions d’une société permet à sa direction et à son conseil d’administration de mieux comprendre comment elle pourrait tirer parti de technologies « vertes » qui sont plus efficaces et d’accélérer l’élaboration de nouvelles technologies sobres en carbone. Le cadre aide les sociétés à développer des activités fondées sur une vision à long terme, à gagner plus de parts de marché que leurs concurrents dont les émissions de carbone sont plus élevées, à prouver aux investisseurs qu’elles peuvent survivre et prospérer dans un monde sobre en carbone, à maximiser leur rendement à long terme et à accélérer la transition globale de l’économie vers les activités à zéro émission nette. Il permet aussi aux sociétés de communiquer de façon transparente les hypothèses qui sous-tendent leurs engagements d’atteindre zéro émission nette, et ce, sans compromettre de données sensibles sur le plan commercial.

Introduction

Il y a un an, l’Institut sur les données d’Investissements RPC a proposé un cadre général d’évaluation des capacités de réduction (le « cadre ») et un modèle normalisé qui permettent aux sociétés de repérer et de déclarer toutes les sources d’émissions de gaz à effet de serre (GES) relatives à leurs activités et à leurs chaînes d’approvisionnement et de calculer s’il est viable sur le plan économique de les réduire en fonction de différents scénarios relatifs au prix du carbone. Les secteurs public et privé ont manifesté un vif intérêt à l’égard du Cadre et y ont réagi.

Au cours des mois qui ont suivi, nous avons sollicité les commentaires d’autres investisseurs institutionnels ainsi que de vérificateurs, de chercheurs, de sociétés fermées commanditées et de consultants afin de mieux comprendre les préoccupations et d’apporter des améliorations au cadre. Investissements RPC mène également continuellement des projets pilotes d’évaluation pour prouver que l’approche permet de repérer d’importantes occasions de réduire les émissions de façon rentable et de fournir aux conseils d’administration et aux investisseurs des données qui sont importantes pour l’affectation des ressources.

Ces discussions et ces projets pilotes ont renforcé notre conviction que les sociétés ont besoin d’un moyen uniforme, rigoureux et transparent de calculer et de déclarer les risques liés à la transition et, plus précisément, leur capacité à atteindre leurs objectifs de zéro émission nette. Nous estimons que le cadre constitue un ajout et un complément précieux aux règles qui ont récemment été proposées par les organismes nationaux et internationaux de réglementation financière pour encadrer l’information relative au climat. Nous recommandons fortement aux conseils d’administration et aux hauts dirigeants des sociétés d’utiliser des évaluations de la réduction des émissions de ce type comme élément de base de leurs stratégies d’affaires.

Nous croyons également qu’à mesure que la réglementation liée au climat prendra de l’importance, les acteurs du marché, en particulier les investisseurs, exigeront le type de rigueur et de transparence que représente ce cadre. À mesure que les organismes de réglementation mettent des règles en place, les investisseurs et leurs bénéficiaires ont intérêt à ce que la transition vers une économie verte soit guidée par des paramètres clairs. Notre cadre offre un mécanisme pour élaborer et présenter ces paramètres.

Signal d’alarme : La transition globale de l’économie vers zéro émission nette est en cours. Votre société est-elle prête?

On ne saurait trop insister sur l’urgence de réduire les émissions de GES et sur les changements radicaux qu’entraînera cette transition. La planète s’est déjà réchauffée de plus de 1 °C depuis l’époque préindustrielle.

Si l’on ne réduit pas les émissions de gaz à effet de serre de façon rapide et substantielle, la hausse atteindra 1,5 °C (2,7 °F) entre 2030 et 2052. Chaque année, les répercussions des changements climatiques, dont l’augmentation de l’intensité des tempêtes, des inondations, des vagues de chaleur et des sécheresses, coûtent des milliards de dollars en dommages et entraînent des souffrances humaines incalculables.

Selon le Groupe intergouvernemental d’experts sur l’évolution du climat, il nous reste trois ans avant qu’il soit crucial d’atteindre le niveau maximal d’émissions de GES à l’échelle mondiale et d’amorcer une baisse rapide pour limiter le réchauffement à environ 1,5 °C. Les conseils d’administration et les hauts dirigeants devraient donc déjà se préparer au fait que l’économie mondiale sera bientôt sobre en carbone.

Ce qu’il faut faire n’est pas non plus un mystère. Les rapports successifs d’organismes comme l’Agence internationale pour les énergies renouvelables et le Risky Business Project indiquent que la réussite de la décarbonisation du système énergétique repose sur trois piliers : 1) accroître considérablement l’efficacité énergétique; 2) produire cette électricité à partir de sources d’émissions zéro carbone, comme l’énergie éolienne, solaire, hydroélectrique, nucléaire et géothermique; et 3) électrifier tout ce qui est possible, du transport aux systèmes de chauffage et de climatisation dans les immeubles. De plus, des stratégies viables sont également proposées pour les secteurs et les industries qui sont difficiles à électrifier directement, comme l’acier, les produits chimiques, le ciment et le transport. Pour ces industries, les combustibles ou les charges d’alimentation pourraient être produits à partir d’électricité renouvelable (dans le cas de l’hydrogène ou de l’ammoniac, par exemple). Les hydrocarbures pourraient continuer à jouer un rôle important s’ils étaient accompagnés de technologies de captage du carbone. De plus, les systèmes alimentaires et les autres secteurs doivent adopter des stratégies sobres en carbone.

Les gouvernements du monde entier ont reconnu la nécessité de décarboniser leur économie et de continuer à les orienter vers zéro émission nette par l’intermédiaire de contributions déterminées au niveau national, qui devraient être encore resserrées pour atteindre la cible de 1,5 °C. Les sociétés qui exercent leurs activités dans ce secteur devront donc décarboniser leurs activités de plus en plus. Dans ce contexte, nous croyons que les conseils d’administration ont la responsabilité de veiller à ce que les équipes de direction envisagent une stratégie de décarbonisation et l’intègrent adéquatement à leurs activités. Le cadre que nous proposons permet aux conseils d’administration de mieux comprendre les leviers dont disposent leurs sociétés pour décarboniser leurs activités et évaluer les progrès accomplis dans ce domaine tout en évitant de contrevenir à la future réglementation.

À mesure que le monde passera à zéro émission nette, nous croyons que des occasions d’investir se présenteront dans l’ensemble des secteurs, des catégories d’actifs et des régions. Ces occasions devraient provenir des chefs de file de l’industrie qui sont à l’origine des innovations et des pratiques en matière de réduction des émissions de carbone. Par exemple, s’ils ne réussissent pas à utiliser leur expertise technique pour produire des moteurs électriques, de chargeurs ou d’autres éléments essentiels de l’économie verte, les fabricants de blocs moteurs et d’injecteurs de carburant d’aujourd’hui deviendront demain l’équivalent des fabricants de fouets pour cochers du siècle dernier. Les chaudières alimentées au gaz naturel seront remplacées par des pompes à chaleur efficaces. Un large éventail d’usines et d’installations alimentant l’économie fondée sur les combustibles fossiles pourrait aussi décliner. Pendant ce temps, la valeur des fournisseurs de composants indispensables pour la nouvelle économie sobre en carbone, comme les matériaux destinés aux batteries, devrait augmenter.

Placements CPP croit que les sociétés qui mettent en œuvre des innovations et des pratiques en matière de réduction du carbone produiront des rendements maximaux. Ces rendements pourraient provenir d’une efficacité accrue et de l’énergie renouvelable, des technologies de captage et de stockage du carbone, ou encore des aliments durables, de l’immobilier ou du transport. Ces sociétés soutiennent non seulement leur propre transition, mais aussi celle des chaînes de valeur dans le cadre desquelles elles fonctionnent. Investissements RPC catalyse ces transitions en investissant dans des sociétés qui ont atteint divers stades de décarbonisation. Grâce à des mesures incitatives et à la capitalisation, la méthode de placement du Fonds, qui est axée sur la décarbonisation, accroît sa valeur et transforme les activités.

– Consultant en services financiers

Pour les sociétés et leurs investisseurs, il est toujours très difficile de composer avec cette transition d’envergure. Les sociétés devront peut-être s’adapter ou même cesser certaines de leurs activités et en commencer d’autres, éliminer progressivement certaines gammes de produits, investir dans de nouvelles technologies, amortir certains actifs plus rapidement, réorganiser leurs chaînes d’approvisionnement ou même relocaliser certaines de leurs installations plus près de sources d’énergie renouvelable ou de combustibles sobres en carbone. La transition sera également un défi pour les investisseurs. Pour canaliser les capitaux vers les occasions offrant le meilleur rendement, les investisseurs ont besoin d’un moyen d’évaluer quelles sont les sociétés qui peuvent réduire les émissions de façon rentable en se tournant vers de nouvelles technologies et de nouvelles sources de carburant, et celles qui sont incapables de réduire leurs émissions, quel que soit le scénario que l’on peut prévoir.

Pourtant, des tables rondes organisées par l’Institut sur les données d’Investissements RPC avec des gestionnaires d’actifs, des comptables et des consultants ont révélé que de nombreuses sociétés tardent à comprendre et à planifier ces changements. Comme le dit un consultant : « De nombreux secteurs connaîtront des changements fondamentaux. Mais beaucoup de sociétés ne comprennent pas les changements qui ont lieu au sein du système. »

– Comptabilité

En toute justice, nous savons qu’il est difficile de prédire l’avenir, surtout lors des grandes transitions. Le passé nous a appris que de nombreuses innovations et nouvelles technologies sont complètement inattendues, tout comme leurs répercussions, et que les coûts diminuent généralement beaucoup plus rapidement que prévu. En fait, même les prévisions récentes les plus optimistes à l’égard des baisses de prix et de la croissance des investissements dans les technologies vertes comme l’énergie solaire photovoltaïque, l’énergie éolienne et le stockage de batteries d’énergie renouvelable ont considérablement sous-estimé le rythme réel des changements.

Le caractère essentiel d’un cadre d’évaluation des capacités de réduction

En février 2022, Investissements RPC s’est engagé à ce que son portefeuille et ses opérations atteignent la cible de zéro émission nette de GES dans tous les domaines d’ici 2050.

Cet engagement est fondé sur le fait que, selon toute attente, la capacité de la communauté internationale d’atteindre zéro émission nette repose sur plusieurs progrès. Ces progrès comprennent l’accélération et le respect des engagements pris par les gouvernements, les progrès technologiques, l’atteinte des cibles des entreprises, les changements dans les comportements des consommateurs et des entreprises, et l’élaboration de normes mondiales en matière de communication de l’information et à l’égard des marchés du carbone, qui seront tous nécessaires pour respecter notre engagement.

Bien que la réduction des émissions et la création de plans de transition soient des tâches difficiles, nos discussions avec des propriétaires et des gestionnaires d’actifs (représentant un actif sous gestion total de plus de 18 000 milliards de dollars américains) ainsi que des comptables et des consultants indiquent que la majorité des sociétés et leurs conseils d’administration n’ont pas encore commencé à relever le défi. En ne voyant pas l’urgence de la décarbonisation, ils mettent leurs entreprises en danger.

Même si certaines sociétés se sont engagées à atteindre zéro émission nette, elles l’ont fait sans établir de plan clair pour atteindre cet objectif. Les rapports sur le développement durable et d’autres documents accessibles au public provenant de 25 grandes sociétés qui ont établi des cibles de zéro émission nette ont été examinés dans le cadre d’une étude récente.1

– Conseiller en services financiers

L’analyse a montré que les plans mis en place par ces sociétés permettraient de réduire les émissions de seulement 40 % plutôt que de 100 %. L’incapacité de ces sociétés à respecter leurs engagements par des trajectoires réalisables de réduction des émissions les expose à des réactions négatives des marchés lorsque les cibles1 ne sont pas atteintes.1 La durabilitéles revers connexes auxquels les sociétés peuvent faire face aujourd’hui soulignent l’importance d’un dialogue ouvert et d’un solide partenariat. Le type de partenariats dans le cadre desquels les investisseurs sont disposés et aptes à adopter une perspective à long terme et à créer activement, au sein des sociétés, un environnement où les solutions peuvent prendre forme.

Nous croyons que notre cadre offre une telle solution. Il s’agit d’un mécanisme visant à aider les sociétés à faire les premiers pas pour évaluer leur capacité de réduire les émissions. Il offre également des incitatifs pour l’élaboration de technologies de décarbonisation et de méthodes rigoureuses pour assurer la qualité des projets de captage de carbone.

– Gestionnaire d’actifs mondial

Le cadre agit comme un GPS lorsqu’on planifie un déplacement. Il présente différents « trajets » vers la décarbonisation, des raccourcis pour atteindre sa destination (en soulignant les mesures et les séquences de mesures les plus efficaces) ainsi que les péages et les frais à assumer en cours de route (en montrant les compromis entre les gains de temps et les coûts liés à chaque possibilité). Il permet également à d’autres, comme les investisseurs, de suivre la progression des sociétés en cours de route. Cela s’ajoute au protocole de validation des cibles de l’Initiative des cibles scientifiques (STBi). Le protocole de SBTi valide la destination et l’échéancier, plutôt que d’indiquer la route et les coûts associés à la réalisation de l’objectif. Les deux approches sont importantes, mais le cadre vise à fournir des indications réalistes à l’échelle des sociétés quant aux mesures à prendre et à l’ordre dans lequel il faut les prendre.

Le cadre comporte trois étapes de base (pour obtenir des renseignements plus détaillés ainsi que le modèle, veuillez consulter l’annexe):

01

Déterminer la capacité de réduction prévue (éprouvée) actuelle.

Pour évaluer leur capacité de réduire leurs émissions de GES, la première étape cruciale que doivent suivre les sociétés consiste à calculer leurs émissions actuelles et à estimer à quel point elles peuvent les réduire de façon rentable (voir l’encadré pour consulter la définition) au moyen de technologies éprouvées actuellement disponibles.

Par exemple, une cimenterie peut être en mesure d’éliminer la totalité des émissions liées à sa consommation d’électricité en utilisant de l’électricité renouvelable, mais incapable de réduire celles de ses fours de façon rentable en utilisant des technologies actuellement disponibles. L’analyse couvrirait à la fois les émissions directes provenant de l’exploitation et des actifs des sociétés (ce que l’on appelle les émissions de portée 1) et les émissions provenant de la production de l’énergie qu’elles utilisent (portée 2). On pourrait effectuer de telles évaluations des capacités de réduction des émissions des sociétés pour d’autres aspects de leurs activités (notamment les voyages d’affaires), de leurs fournisseurs et de leurs clients (portée 3), ce qui permettrait d’obtenir des paramètres vérifiables résumant leur capacité de réduire leurs émissions. Les émissions de portée 3 sont les plus difficiles à évaluer pour les sociétés, car leurs fournisseurs et leurs clients devraient fournir des évaluations de leur capacité de réduire leurs propres émissions de portée 1 et 2. La situation est particulièrement difficile à l’échelle des chaînes d’approvisionnement complexes.

Les méthodes d’évaluation des émissions de portée 3 permettant d’éviter le double comptage et d’assurer l’intégrité des données sont encore à un stade embryonnaire. En attendant qu’elles soient au point, nous croyons que les sociétés devraient se concentrer sur l’évaluation de leurs émissions de portée 1 et 2.

Définition du concept de « réduction rentable »

Il existe plusieurs méthodes pour déterminer si les investissements en matière de réduction des émissions sont rentables actuellement. Pour notre cadre d’évaluation des capacités de réduction des émissions, nous utilisons le concept standard de la « valeur actualisée nette ». Il est rentable de réduire les émissions si l’ensemble des coûts (notamment les coûts liés au capital, au carburant, à l’exploitation et à l’entretien) est inférieur aux revenus totaux pendant la durée de l’investissement. Le taux d’actualisation type peut être de 5 % à 10 % (ce qui permet aux sociétés de comparer facilement le taux du rendement lié à la réduction de leurs émissions avec celui d’autres investissements qu’elles pourraient effectuer), mais il est plus important que le chiffre soit transparent que de parvenir à le déterminer avec exactitude. Les mesures d’efficience offrent des rendements particulièrement élevés, tandis que les placements nécessitant des dépenses en immobilisations plus importantes peuvent être moins économiques. À mesure que les prix du carbone augmentent, un projet d’atténuation devient plus économique, car le coût de l’absence de mise en œuvre augmente également avec la hausse du prix du carbone. Par conséquent, même si les technologies de réduction ne changent pas, la réduction deviendra plus économique avec le temps si les prix réels ou parallèles augmentent.

02

Évaluer la capacité de réduction prévue (probable) à long terme.

Les incertitudes relatives aux coûts technologiques, au rythme des innovations, aux régimes réglementaires et aux prix du carbone font en sorte qu’il est difficile de normaliser les méthodes d’évaluation des capacités de réduction futures. Pour composer avec cette complexité, nous proposons aux sociétés de ne pas modifier la réglementation et les coûts technologiques actuels et d’utiliser plutôt des prix de carbone normalisés plus élevés que les prix actuels.

Dans notre cadre initial, nous avons utilisé 75 $ US et 150 $ US par tonne métrique d’équivalent en dioxyde de carbone (tonne d’équivalent CO₂) pour créer deux scénarios afin de pouvoir déterminer les capacités de réduction futures. Pour permettre la prise de décisions concrètes, le prix du carbone lors de l’évaluation initiale doit être supérieur au cours au comptant actuel le plus élevé, lequel a atteint 99 € par tonne d’équivalent CO₂ au sein de l’Union européenne au début d’août. Nous modifions donc le prix du carbone dans ce cadre pour qu’il soit de 100 $ US et de 150 $ US le tCO₂e. Le prix de 100 $ US par tonne d’éq. CO₂ permet aux sociétés de déclarer leur capacité supplémentaire à diminuer par rapport au prix au comptant. Par ailleurs, on considère généralement qu’un prix de 150 $ US par tonne d’équivalent CO₂ est nécessaire pour que les incitatifs soient suffisants pour permettre de décarboniser l’ensemble de l’économie mondiale. L’utilisation d’un prix du carbone de 150 $ US par tonne d’équivalent CO₂, qui peut paraître élevé actuellement, pourrait accroître la visibilité de la capacité des sociétés à réduire davantage leurs émissions.

Toutefois, en plus du prix du carbone, les sociétés pourraient également envisager d’utiliser des prix établis à l’interne en fonction de leur propre situation.

Les capacités de réduction rentable calculées en fonction de ces prix pourraient faire l’objet de révisions à mesure que la réglementation progressera ou que les coûts technologiques diminueront. L’évaluation des futures capacités de réduction devra donc être effectuée périodiquement, idéalement une fois par année.

03

Déterminer la capacité de réduction prévue non rentable.

Investissements RPC estime que le cadre permettra aux sociétés de repérer des occasions de réduire leurs émissions. Certaines d’entre elles pourraient même constater qu’elles peuvent atteindre zéro émission nette en fonction de divers prix du carbone. Toutefois, d’autres constateront que l’élimination de certaines émissions n’est pas rentable, voire impossible sur le plan technique. Ces émissions résiduelles pourraient ensuite être déclarées, accompagnées de solutions hypothétiques de la direction des sociétés concernées pour régler les problèmes sous-jacents. Parmi les stratégies possibles, mentionnons la réduction gérée ou l’abandon d’activités commerciales (comme la fermeture de mines de charbon), l’utilisation de nouvelles technologies (comme les combustibles synthétiques) ou l’acquisition de méthodes permanentes de captation de grande qualité comme les crédits carbone.

abatement Capacity Assessment

Leçons tirées de l’application du cadre d’évaluation des capacités de réduction

Pour déterminer la faisabilité du cadre et en favoriser la mise en œuvre à plus grande échelle, Investissements RPC teste son utilisation auprès de certaines sociétés de son portefeuille actif et de ses propres activités.

Le cadre joue un rôle important dans la méthode de placement d’Investissements RPC, qui est axée sur la décarbonisation. Cette approche unique met l’accent sur le financement de la réduction des émissions et l’établissement de partenariats avec certains grands émetteurs pour susciter des progrès, aussi importants que nécessaires, vers zéro émission nette au sein de l’économie réelle. Ce faisant, nous tirons parti de la valeur que présente la transition. Le cadre fait partie des outils que le Fonds utilisera pour mettre en œuvre cette approche. La première évaluation pilote a été réalisée sur le Trafford Centre, un centre commercial qui se trouve en périphérie de Manchester, en Angleterre, et accueille plus de 35 millions de visiteurs se déplaçant à pied par année. Le Trafford Centre, qui était le plus grand centre commercial du Royaume-Uni lorsqu’il a ouvert ses portes en 1998, a changé plusieurs fois de propriétaire avant d’être acquis par le groupe Titres de créance adossés à des actifs réels d’Investissements RPC en décembre 2020. Il fait maintenant partie du portefeuille immobilier d’Investissements RPC.

Écoutez Fraser Pearce, le président du conseil d’administration indépendant du Trafford Centre, nous parler de l’utilisation du cadre par le conseil pour éclairer la société dans son parcours vers zéro émission nette.

Le cadre a contribué à gérer les émissions de base du Centre. Les données ont révélé d’importantes occasions de réduire de façon rentable la plupart des émissions du Centre, et une grande partie de ces réductions ont un coût étonnamment faible (voir encadré). L’exercice a également permis de trouver d’éventuelles façons de réduire le reste des émissions pour atteindre zéro émission nette. Investissements RPC a fourni une description de cette étude de cas au Groupe de travail sur l’information financière relative aux changements climatiques (GIFCC) afin qu’elle soit ajoutée à son rapport d’étape de 2022.

Les cinq prochains projets pilotes (fondés sur le cadre) liés à la méthode de placement axée sur la décarbonisation du Fonds étaient toujours en cours lorsque ce rapport a été terminé. Ces projets pilotes devraient rendre les sociétés concernées plus concurrentielles au fil de la transition de l’ensemble de l’économie mondiale vers une économie à zéro émission nette. Jusqu’ici, les projets pilotes ont surtout permis d’apprendre que cet exercice procure aux conseils d’administration et aux équipes de direction une valeur élevée en leur permettant de repérer des occasions qu’ils auraient autrement pu manquer. Ces occasions vont au-delà de la recherche de possibilités viables de réduire les émissions. Elles comprennent le fait de trouver des stratégies pour réduire les coûts, gagner des parts de marché et obtenir le soutien des investisseurs tout en devenant un chef de file de l’économie sobre en carbone de demain. Pour les investisseurs, ces projets pilotes montrent que le cadre peut leur fournir des indications cruciales sur la viabilité à long terme des sociétés.

– Conseiller en services financiers

Les projets pilotes soulignent également l’importance de mettre à jour périodiquement les évaluations des capacités de réduction des émissions. Les technologies et les coûts connexes évoluent si rapidement que les résultats changeront au fil du temps, et ce, parfois énormément. Par exemple, la baisse du coût des énergies renouvelables et des électrolyseurs, qui utilisent l’électricité pour décomposer l’eau en oxygène et en hydrogène, pourrait faire baisser les coûts de l’hydrogène « vert » jusqu’à ce que l’on atteigne un point d’inflexion où il deviendra soudainement un substitut rentable aux hydrocarbures et aux charges d’alimentation pour l’industrie lourde, le transport, l’aviation et l’agriculture (sous forme d’ammoniac « vert »).

En raison des nombreux avantages découlant des évaluations périodiques des capacités de réduction des émissions, Investissements RPC vise à ce que les sociétés de son portefeuille qui n’ont pas encore élaboré de plans de transition crédibles adoptent largement cette approche. Pour atteindre cet objectif, nous mettons des experts internes et externes à la disposition de certaines sociétés de notre portefeuille pour effectuer les évaluations initiales. Nous nous attendons à ce que les sociétés développent, au fil du temps, une expertise à l’interne pour effectuer ces évaluations. Jusqu’à présent, notre travail nous a permis de trouver beaucoup plus de consultants qui souhaitent aider les sociétés à évaluer leurs capacités à effectuer ces évaluations initiales que prévu. La concurrence qui en résultera devrait exercer une pression à la baisse sur les prix.

Projet pilote du Trafford Centre

Le Trafford Centre est l’un des dix principaux centres commerciaux du Royaume-Uni et est situé à Manchester. Il compte plus de 150 magasins et une excellente offre de restaurants, de cafés et d’installations de loisirs.

trafford Centre Pilot

Le Centre, qui appartient exclusivement à Investissements RPC, a été considéré comme un site approprié pour notre premier projet pilote du cadre d’évaluation des capacités de réduction. La direction était particulièrement enthousiaste à l’égard de cet exercice, car elle croyait fermement que le fait de rendre le centre commercial plus « vert » lui procurerait un avantage concurrentiel important pour attirer à la fois des clients et des locataires, et ainsi mieux le positionner par rapport aux actifs comparables.

En dix semaines, une équipe ayant une connaissance approfondie de la société a réalisé un inventaire des émissions de gaz à effet de serre du Centre pour la première fois et a déterminé qu’il était possible d’éliminer plus des deux tiers de ses émissions de portée 1 et 2 de façon rentable d’ici 2030. Le cadre a souligné à la direction l’importance de trouver des solutions de réduction rentables des émissions résiduelles.

Selon l’analyse, la société a conclu que d’ici 2030, 44 % des réductions proviendraient de la décarbonisation prévue du réseau électrique alimentant le Centre. Selon une évaluation d’octobre 2022, le Centre a le potentiel de réduire 56 % de ses émissions de portée 1 et 2 à l’aide de mesures de réduction économique. Le Centre mettra en œuvre ces mesures économiques à court terme dans le cadre de son plan d’amélioration et d’entretien de 10 millions de livres sterling déjà engagé. Ces mesures comprennent l’installation d’un éclairage plus efficace, le remplacement d’équipement désuet et la mise à niveau des ascenseurs. De plus, l’équipe a procédé à une analyse de scénarios afin d’examiner d’autres mesures potentielles visant à réduire les émissions du Centre et a évalué la viabilité économique de ces mesures non seulement de façon indépendante, mais aussi dans une optique globale de production de revenus et de capital. Selon l’analyse, en date d’aujourd’hui, des mesures comme le remplacement des brûleurs à gaz par des pompes à chaleur ou l’installation de chauffe-eau directs au Trafford Centre sont économiquement viables. L’équipe a toutefois identifié des projets comme l’énergie solaire sur place et explore d’autres options hors site pour le Centre afin d’obtenir d’autres sources d’énergie renouvelable, y compris des ententes d’achat d’énergie. Ces projets seront les principaux moteurs de la stratégie visant à accélérer la réduction des émissions du Centre et à réduire la dépendance à la décarbonisation du réseau au fil du temps.

Le cadre a contribué à donner au conseil d’administration du Trafford Centre la confiance nécessaire pour qu’il s’engage à ce que ses activités dégagent zéro émission nette d’ici 2030. Il serait possible d’éliminer 100 % des émissions de portée 1 et 2 du Trafford Centre au moyen des mesures technologiques qui existent aujourd’hui, mais ces mesures ne sont pas toutes économiquement viables à l’heure actuelle. Ces mesures feront l’objet d’un suivi dans le cadre du plan d’entretien continu du Centre. Le cadre fournit des résultats clairs qui seront désormais intégrés au processus de surveillance et de production de rapports du Trafford Centre.

La société s’engage également à appuyer ses locataires et ses clients dans leur parcours de décarbonisation en leur fournissant l’information dont ils ont besoin pour la décarbonisation des espaces partagés, et ce, afin de réduire les émissions de la portée 3 du Centre. Le Trafford Centre prévoit notamment, entre autres mesures, fournir de l’énergie renouvelable produite sur place (comme indiqué précédemment), développer des capacités de recharge des véhicules électriques de premier plan, encourager ses employés à opter pour des moyens de transport sobres en carbone, continuer de travailler à l’élimination des déchets dirigés vers des sites d’enfouissement et utiliser des baux verts à l’avant-garde du marché. L’équipe de direction de Trafford Centre estime que le cadre lui a fourni un point de départ à partir duquel la société peut maintenant tracer son parcours vers zéro émission nette. De plus, il fournit aux investisseurs des renseignements essentiels sur la viabilité économique actuelle sans révéler de secrets concurrentiels. Tout en augmentant l’attrait de l’actif sur les marchés financiers, en raison de son plan de décarbonisation bien établi. Dans le cadre de ce travail, le Trafford Centre a réussi à protéger la valeur future de l’actif, en le positionnant de façon à tirer parti de la prime verte potentielle, des tendances ou à éviter les escomptes potentiels sur l’actif brun.

Voir le tableau 1 : Trafford Centre Abatement Capacity Assessment Scopes 1 and 2 GHG emissions and drivers of decarbonization determined by Abatement Capacity Assessment– 2019 snapshot and Table 2 : Évaluation de la capacité de réduction du centre Trafford en tenant compte de la viabilité économique – 2022.. L’aperçu est pour 2019, car il s’agit de la dernière année avant que la pandémie de COVID-19 fausse les données sur les émissions.

Tableau 1 : Trafford Centre Scopes 1 et 2 Facteurs d’émissions de GES et de décarbonisation – Aperçu 2019

Portée 1 Portée 2 Total pour les volets 1 et 2 en % du total
GES (t. d’éq. GES) G 1,275 3,110 4,385 100%
Efficience E 0 3 3 0%
Investissement (demande) ID 1,275 311 1,586 36%
Investissement (offre) SI 0 872 872 20%
Énergies renouvelables ÉR 0 1,924 1,924 44%
Total CRP-A 1,275 3,110 4,385 100%
en % du total C 29% 71% 100%

PARTIE 2 : Évaluation de la capacité de réduction du centre Trafford en tenant compte de la viabilité économique – 20221

Portée 1 Portée 2 Total pour les volets 1 et 2
GES (t. d’éq. GES) G 1,275 3,110 4,385
Capacité de réduction prévue (éprouvée) actuelle. CRP-A -228 -2,2432 -2,471
en % du total 18% 72% 56%
Rentable à 150 $ t d’éq. CO2 Rent. à 100 0 0 0
Rentable à 150 $ US/t d’éq. CO2 Rent. à 150 0 845 845
CRP à long terme (probable) CRP-LT 0 845 845
en % du total L/G 0% 27% 19%
Réduction non rentable U 1,047 22 1,069
en % du total U/G 82% 1% 24%

Le tableau 1 présente un aperçu des émissions de GES des Scopes 1 et 2 du Centre Trafford en 2019 et les facteurs de décarbonisation découlant de l’évaluation de la capacité de réduction. L’aperçu est pour 2019, car il s’agit de la dernière année avant que la pandémie de COVID-19 fausse les données sur les émissions. La portée des émissions ne tient compte que des émissions du bâtiment. La portée 1 porte sur l’utilisation du gaz par les propriétaires, les véhicules à moteur à combustion interne et les émissions de réfrigérants. La portée 2 est la consommation d’électricité par le propriétaire. Les renseignements relatifs à ces émissions sont conformes à la norme mondiale de comptabilisation et de communication de l’information relative aux GES du Partnership for Carbon Accounting Financials ainsi qu’à l’approche de la Science Based Targets Initiative pour les immeubles locatifs.

  • Les émissions seront différentes en 2022 en raison de la décarbonisation du réseau électrique et des variations du taux d’occupation du Centre, qui se situait entre 90 % et 95 % en 2019, mais a diminué pendant la pandémie de COVID-19.
  • GES : Émissions totales du Trafford Centre réparties par portée. Comme nous n’avons pas encore terminé l’analyse complète des coûts des mesures de réduction de la portée 3, aux fins de cet exercice, nous n’incluons pas les émissions de la portée 3.
  • L’efficacité comprend la réduction des émissions sans engager de dépenses en immobilisations, y compris les changements de comportement et l’optimisation des technologies de construction.
  • Les placements comprennent : (i) la demande d’investissement (ID), c’est-à-dire les dépenses en immobilisations qui diminuent la demande d’énergie, comme le remplacement des lumières externes, des appareils de levage, des escaliers mécaniques et du toit, et (ii) l’offre d’investissement (IS), c’est-à-dire les dépenses en immobilisations qui augmentent l’offre d’énergie verte, y compris les ententes d’achat d’énergie solaire photovoltaïque et d’énergie sur place.
  • Les énergies renouvelables font référence à la décarbonisation qui découle d’un changement dans les énergies renouvelables pour la production d’électricité ou l’électricité consommée par le réseau. Cette décision est fondée sur les indications supplémentaires du gouvernement du Royaume-Uni au Livre vert du Trésor.

Le tableau 2 présente l’évaluation de la capacité de réduction des émissions de GES des Scopes 1 et 2 du Centre Trafford, en tenant compte de la viabilité économique de la réduction. Le tableau 2 présente le sommaire de haut niveau du tableau 1 sous forme de données prouvées, probables et peu rentables pour réduire la capacité de réduction prévue. Nous n’avons pas encore terminé l’analyse complète des coûts des mesures de réduction de la portée 3. Donc, aux fins de cet exercice, nous n’incluons pas les émissions de GES de la portée 3.

  • Capacité de réduction prévue (éprouvée) actuelle. Dans quelle mesure les émissions actuelles sont-elles susceptibles de diminuer grâce aux technologies économiques éprouvées actuellement disponibles?
  • Capacité de réduction prévue à long terme (probable) : attribuable à des solutions qui deviendraient économiques à des prix du carbone futurs prédéterminés et à un prix parallèle interne optionnel propre à la société qui se situe bien dans les limites de ceux jugés nécessaires pour soutenir un résultat net zéro. Cet instantané utilise des prix du carbone de 100 $ US le tCO2e et de 150 $ US le tCO2e pour créer deux scénarios permettant de déterminer la capacité future de réduction.
  • Réduction non rentable Émissions non rentables, voire impossibles à éliminer sur le plan technologique.

Remarques :

  1. Les pourcentages indiqués dans le graphique ci-dessus sont arrondis et peuvent ne pas totaliser 100 %.

  2. Les émissions de base réelles de la portée 2 pour 2019 pour le Centre Trafford étaient de 2 670 tonnes métriques. Toutefois, le nombre indiqué dans le tableau tient compte de l’électrification des processus générant des émissions de portée 1 qui augmenteraient la demande d’électricité et les émissions associées de portée 2. Par conséquent, l’analyse des émissions de la portée 2 de la décarbonisation comprend non seulement les émissions sous-jacentes de la portée 2 de 2019 pour le Trafford Centre, mais aussi l’augmentation présumée des émissions associées à la portée 1 de la décarbonisation.

Le contexte réglementaire en évolution

Au départ, lorsqu’Investissements RPC a proposé le cadre, la déclaration de la réduction des émissions et des cibles connexes était strictement volontaire.

Au départ, lorsqu’Investissements RPC a proposé le cadre, la déclaration de la réduction des émissions et des cibles connexes était strictement volontaire. Plus de 3 600 sociétés et organisations du monde ont approuvé les lignes directrices volontaires du GIFCC aux changements climatiques (qu’Investissements RPC a contribué à façonner en tant que membre fondateur et l’une des deux seules caisses de retraite siégeant au GIFCC). La valeur du travail du GIFCC et de ses recommandations est devenue de plus en plus évidente pour le marché. Depuis que le GIFCC a publié son rapport d’étape de 2021, près de 900 sociétés et autres organisations ont choisi de les suivre. Notre cadre offre une nouvelle approche complémentaire.

Toutefois, la réglementation est en train de changer. Le 18 octobre 2021, les Autorités canadiennes en valeurs mobilières (ACVM) ont proposé des règles obligatoires pour encadrer la présentation d’information liée au climat. Cette politique obligerait les sociétés à déclarer les risques et les occasions liés au climat à court, moyen et long terme, ainsi que leur incidence sur leurs activités, leurs stratégies et leurs activités de planification financière. Les sociétés devraient également déclarer leurs émissions de gaz à effet de serre (de portée 1, 2 et 3) ou expliquer pourquoi elles ne peuvent le faire.

– Conseiller en services financiers

Le 21 mars 2022, la Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) américaine a proposé des règles obligatoires encore plus détaillées. En plus d’exiger des rapports sur les émissions, les risques relatifs aux dangers physiques liés au climat et les risques liés à la transition qui est en cours, les règles proposées par la SEC exigeraient la communication des cibles de réduction des émissions ainsi que des plans visant à atteindre ces cibles. Le Royaume-Uni, la Nouvelle-Zélande, le Japon, Hong Kong et l’Union européenne adoptent tous des mesures semblables. De plus, les Normes internationales d’information financière ont mis sur pied l’International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB), dont la gouvernance est la même que celle de l’International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). Tout comme l’IASB sert de référence mondiale pour l’information financière, l’ISSB servira de référence mondiale pour l’information relative à la durabilité. La publication de sa première norme relative au climat est attendue d’ici la fin de 2022.

L’élaboration de tous ces règlements n’est pas encore terminée. Mais les règles proposées contribuent à réaliser ce que préconise Investissements RPC depuis longtemps : inciter les conseils d’administration et les membres de la haute direction des sociétés à se concentrer sur l’urgence de la décarbonisation et de l’adoption des plans de transition énergétique. « Les règles proposées par la SEC sont un signal d’alarme pour les chefs des finances », affirme un consultant.

L’évolution de la réglementation confirme notre façon de voir le rôle du cadre d’évaluation des capacités de réduction. Plutôt que de constituer un exercice distinct, il peut fonctionner plus efficacement en complément des recommandations du GIFCC et de la future réglementation, ce qui explique pourquoi il figure dans le rapport d’étape 2022 du GIFCC. Comme l’explique un consultant : « Il ne doit pas s’agir d’un concept distinct. Il faut le formuler de façon à répondre aux exigences. »

Investissements RPC estime que le cadre peut jouer exactement ce rôle en offrant une feuille de route pour décrive le travail de base nécessaire pour répondre aux exigences réglementaires et protéger les portefeuilles contre les risques indus. Il fournit également une méthode pour présenter des rapports sur la faisabilité économique du respect des engagements de zéro émission nette comme l’ont fait de nombreuses sociétés. Or, le marché n’a actuellement pas de convention à ce sujet. Utilisé en tant que procédure normalisée, il permet de faire des comparaisons entre les sociétés et les régions, ce qui a une importance cruciale pour les investisseurs. Le fait que les méthodes comptables ne soient pas cohérentes entre les pays peut faire obstacle à la mobilité internationale des capitaux. Si un nombre suffisant de sociétés adoptent le cadre ou des outils similaires, nous croyons qu’il peut susciter des changements économiques fondamentaux à l’échelle des secteurs et des pays, et peut-être même contribuer à orienter la réglementation finale. Nous comprenons que MSCI ESG Research examine cette nouvelle approche en vue de l’inclure dans certains de ses produits.

Le moment est venu

Investissements RPC considère que le moment est venu pour les conseils d’administration et les hauts dirigeants de sociétés de commencer à évaluer leur potentiel de réduire leurs émissions et à planifier la transition, non pas en tant qu’exigence réglementaire supplémentaire, mais comme élément de base de leur stratégie de gestion. Comme le démontrent nos évaluations pilotes, la mise en œuvre de plans de transition et de mesures d’évaluation du potentiel de réduction des émissions peut avoir des avantages réels et importants. La transition vers un avenir sobre en carbone s’accélère. Les sociétés ne peuvent se permettre d’être laissées pour compte et les investisseurs ne devraient pas prendre de risque.

Les citations présentées dans le présent document sont fondées sur les commentaires des participants, y compris les propriétaires d’actifs, les gestionnaires d’actifs, les comptables, les auditeurs et les consultants, dans le rapport L’avenir de la transition aux changements climatiques : Tables rondes des formateurs tenues de mars à avril 2022 et d’autres experts auxquels nous avons parlé du cadre.

Nous aimerions connaître votre expérience en ce qui concerne la mise en œuvre du cadre d’évaluation de la capacité de réduction. Pour nous faire part de votre histoire, communiquez avec nous à insightsinstitute@cppib.com

the Time Is Now

Annexe

Évaluation de la capacité de réduction : Modèle de rapport sur la capacité de réduction prévue

Ce modèle vise à aider les sociétés à créer une feuille de route réalisable pour les guider de façon cohérente dans leur transition élargie vers zéro émission nette de GES.

Au fil du temps, la capacité de réduction d’une société devrait faire l’objet de rapports sur les émissions de portée 1, 2 et 3 en fonction de sa situation actuelle et de différentes hypothèses sur le prix du carbone. Nous reconnaissons que la production de rapports sur les émissions de portée 3 peut nécessiter un certain temps, car elle dépend de la capacité de réduction prévue (CRP) des émissions de portée 1 et de portée 2 des fournisseurs et des clients.

Pour certaines sociétés, la CRP actuelle couvrira la quasi-totalité des émissions. Toutefois, nous reconnaissons que de nombreux secteurs font face à des défis considérables en matière de décarbonation et, pour eux, on considérera qu’une grande partie de leurs émissions actuelles seront réputées non rentables. Dans cette catégorie, nous espérons que les sous-évaluations porteront sur un continuum d’options de transition potentielles, y compris les fermetures de secteurs d’activité, les technologies de transformation futures faisant l’objet d’une vérification préalable de la part de la société et, lorsque celle-ci est inévitable, l’utilisation continue de mesures compensatoires d’élimination de haute qualité.

Exemple Portée 1 Portée 2 Portée 3 Total Portée 1 Portée 2 Portée 3 Total
GES (t. d’eg. GES) G G1 G2 G3 Gt 1500 800 2,500 4,800
Efficience E E1 E2 E3 Et 400 100 1,100 1,600 33%
Investissement (demande) ID ID1 ID2 ID3 IDt 200 50 100 50 7%
Investissement (offre) SI IS2 IS3 ISt 50 100 50 3%
Énergies renouvelables ÉR ÉR1 ÉR2 ÉR3 ÉRt 100 200 1,000 1,300 27%
CRP actuelle (éprouvée) CRP-A CRP-A1 CRP-A2 CRP-A3 CRP-At 700 400 2,300 3,400 71%
en % du total C CRP-A1/G1 CRP-A2/G2 CRP-A3/G3 CRP-At/Gt 47% 50% 92% 71%
Rentable à 100 $ US/t d’éq. CO₂ Rent. à 100 Rent.100-1 Rent.100-2 Rent.100-3 Rent.100-t 50 200 250 5%
Rentable à 150 $ US/t d’éq. CO₂ Rent. à 150 Rent.150-1 Rent.150-2 Rent.150-3 Rent.150-t 200 200 100 500 10%
Rentable à un prix symbolique interne Rent. à prix int. Rent.int-1 Rent.int-2 Rent.int-3 Rent.int-t 200 200 4%
CRP à long terme (probable) CRP-LT CRP-LT1 CRP-LT2 CRP-LT3 CRP-LTt 450 400 100 950 20%
en % du total CRP-LT1/G1 CRP-LT2/G2 CRP-LT3/G3 CRP-LTt/Gt 30% 50% 4% 20%
Fermeture/abandon A A1 A2 A3 At 150 100 250 5%
Technologie transformatrice T T1 T2 T3 Tt 150 150 3%
Mesures de compensation au moyen de crédits d’élimination O O1 O2 O3 Ot 50 50 1%
CRP non rentable CRP-NR CRP-NR1 CRP-NR2 CRP-NR3 CRP-NRt 350 100 450 9%
en % du total CRP-NR1/G1 CRP-NR2/G2 CRP-NR3/G3 CRP-NRt/Gt 23% 13% 4% 9%

Remarque : Les pourcentages indiqués dans le graphique ci-dessus sont arrondis et peuvent ne pas totaliser 100 %. Pour assurer la cohérence et la comparabilité du présent cadre, toutes les évaluations des capacités doivent être déclarées comme étant pertinentes sur le plan régional (c’est-à-dire que les mesures présentées doivent tenir compte notamment de la réglementation, des coûts, des subventions et des prix du carbone en vigueur dans la région).

Gt = Émissions de GES de portée 1 + portée 2 + portée 3. Dans la mesure où les sociétés ne sont pas encore en mesure de déclarer les trois portées, il est possible de commencer à déclarer la portée 1 et la portée 2. Bon nombre de ces données sont déjà communiquées par le CDP et les rapports des sociétés. Ajout des données de la portée 3 lorsque les fournisseurs et les clients déclarent leur portée 1 et leur portée 2.

Et Pourcentage de l’indice Gt prévu pouvant être corrigé par des initiatives d’« efficience » (p. ex., l’arrêt des fuites de méthane, la gestion des immeubles, l’utilisation de l’alimentation à quai, les changements comportementaux, etc.).

IDt Pourcentage de Gt prévu qui devrait être corrigé par un « investissement » dans des solutions de réduction qui sont rentables aux coûts actuels, les prix du carbone et la réglementation en vigueur (p. ex., passage aux véhicules électriques, pompes à chaleur, modernisation, etc.).

ISt = Pourcentage du Gt qui devrait être corrigé par « Investissement (Offre) » qui augmente l’offre d’énergie renouvelable accélérant la décarbonisation des émissions des Scopes 2 et 3 avant l’écologisation prévue du réseau (p. ex., investissements dans des ententes d’achat d’énergie solaire sur toit, d’énergie éolienne captive et d’énergie électrique).

Rt = Pourcentage de l’indice Gt prévu pouvant être rajusté au moyen d’une transition vers les « énergies renouvelables » pour la production d’électricité ou l’électricité consommée par le réseau. De nombreuses sociétés signalent déjà des émissions indirectes provenant de la consommation d’électricité, de sorte que certaines de ces données sont déjà disponibles.

Ct = Et + It + ÉRt = « Capacité de réduction prévue actuelle » pour réduire les émissions totales (Gt). Nous nous attendons à ce que la convention relative à la présentation de l’information indique par défaut qu’il s’agit d’un pourcentage des émissions totales (c.-à-d. que dans l’exemple ci-dessus, la capacité de réduction prévue actuelle de la société est de 71 %).

EC100-t « Capacité de réduction prévue actuelle » pour réduire les émissions totales (Gt). Nous nous attendons à ce que la convention relative à la présentation de l’information indique par défaut qu’il s’agit d’un pourcentage des émissions totales (c.-à-d. que dans l’exemple ci-dessus, la capacité de réduction prévue actuelle de la société est de 71 %).

Rent.c150-t = Pourcentage des émissions de GES totales (Gt) prévu comme étant « Rentable à réduire à un prix du carbone de 150 $ US/t. d’éq. CO₂ ». Comme ci-dessus, mais pour un prix du carbone supérieur.

Rent.cInt-t =  Pourcentage des émissions de GES totales (Gt) prévu comme étant « Rentable à réduire au prix du carbone établi à l’interne par la société ». Comme ci-dessus, mais cette mesure optionnelle permet d’utiliser un prix du carbone établi par la société en tenant compte de son point de vue en ce qui concerne le prix du carbone approprié à utiliser dans le cadre de ses décisions financières.

Lt = Ec100-t + Ec150-t +EcInt-t = « Capacité de réduction prévue à long terme » attribuable à des solutions qui deviendraient économiques à des prix du carbone futurs prédéterminés et à une société optionnelleun prix du carbone parallèle interne précis qui se situe bien dans les limites de ceux jugés nécessaires pour soutenir un résultat net-zéro. Même si la capacité de réduction prévue actuelle et la capacité de réduction prévue à long terme devraient être déclarées indépendamment, nous nous attendons à ce que la convention du marché additionne les deux pour obtenir la « capacité de réduction prévue » et la désigne comme un pourcentage des émissions totales (p. ex. ci-dessus, la CRP de la société est de 91 %).

CRP-NRt = At + Tt + Ot = « Capacité de réduction prévue non rentable ». Pourcentage de Gt qui nécessiterait « l’abandon/la fermeture d’actifs », le déploiement de « technologies transformatrices » et des « mesures de compensation » au moyen de crédits d’élimination. Il s’agit de la valeur résiduelle de Gt qui ne devrait pas être corrigée par Ct + CRP-LTt et qui nécessiterait une fermeture, une innovation des technologies transformatrices ou une élimination au moyen de solutions vérifiables permanentes.

Richard Manley

Richard Manley linkedin Icon

Chef du développement durable, directeur général et chef de l’investissement durable

M. Manley dirige l’équipe chargée d’intégrer les questions environnementales, sociales et de gouvernance, y compris les risques et les occasions liés aux changements climatiques à l’ensemble de nos programmes de placement. Avant d’entrer au service de RPC Investissements il a passé 18 ans chez Goldman Sachs, où il était en dernier responsable mondial des actions thématiques et de la recherche sur les ESG, et cochef de la recherche sur les actions pour la région de l’EMEA. Auparavant, il a travaillé chez Merrill Lynch, Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, et à la division Marché des capitaux de Paribas à titre d’analyste des titres de sociétés pétrolières et gazières intégrées. Il est titulaire d’un baccalauréat spécialisé (avec distinction) en administration des affaires européennes de l’ICADE à Madrid. M. Manley est président du Groupe consultatif des investisseurs du SASB, représentant d’Investissements RPC au sein du Groupe de travail sur l’information financière relative aux changements climatiques ainsi que membre du Delivery Group du Transition Plan Taskforce du gouvernement du Royaume-Uni. M. Manley siège au conseil consultatif de l’Institut sur les données d’Investissements RPC et y contribue fréquemment2.

Tim Barlow

Tim Barlow linkedin Icon

Directeur général, Immobilier, Placements en actifs réels, Investissements RPC

M. Barlow est directeur général de l’équipe d’investissement durable responsable de l’immobilier. Avant 2022, il était directeur général dans l’équipe des placements immobiliers d’Investissements RPC responsable du montage et de la gestion de portefeuille en Europe continentale (p. ex., Allemagne et ECO). Avant de se joindre à Investissements RPC, il travaillait à Grosvenor pour leurs actifs immobiliers à Londres et leurs activités de gestion de fonds, à Paris. Il est titulaire d’un baccalauréat spécialisé (avec distinction) de l’Université d’Édimbourg et d’une maîtrise en finance immobilière de l’Université de Reading. De plus, M. Barlow est membre de la Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

Katrina Beechey

Katrina Beechey linkedin Icon

Directrice générale, Création de valeur du portefeuille, Placements en actifs réels, Investissements RPC

Avant de se joindre à Investissements RPC, Mme Beechey était vice-présidente principale de la Transformation à Burberry et gestionnaire à Bain & Company, à Londres. Elle possède une vaste expérience du commerce de détail, puisqu’elle a travaillé auprès de marques et de détaillants, et en immobilier. Auparavant, elle a travaillé chez Christies et Monitor Deloitte. Mme Meechey est titulaire d’une maîtrise (avec distinction) de l’Université Cambridge en histoire de l’art.

Nous remercions tout particulièrement les personnes suivantes pour leur contribution à ce rapport à titre d’experts :

Alexis Wegerich, Chef, Analyse ESG, Gouvernance d’entreprise, Gestion de placements Norges Bank
Bill Murphy, Conseiller principal, Services ESG, KPMG LLP
Fraser Pearce, président du conseil d’administration indépendant, Trafford Centre
Robert Gibson, professeur auxiliaire, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Tim Smith, analyste de recherche, Changements climatiques et transition énergétique, Lazard
Torsten Lichtenau, Associé principal et chef mondial de la zone d’impact de la transition carbone, Bain & Company
Vinay Shandal, directeur général et associé, Boston Consulting Group

Notes de bas de page

  1. Le portefeuille d’Investissements RPC comprend des placements dans certaines sociétés examinées dans le cadre de cette étude.
  2. Le Groupe consultatif des investisseurs du SASB deviendra le Groupe consultatif des investisseurs de l’ISSB (IIAG) à la fin de 2022. Richard Manley, directeur général et chef de l’investissement durable, équipe de direction mondiale, agira à titre de président de l’IIAG après cette transition.

 

More from CPP Investments

cpp425 Hero Image V147

Soyez assuré que le Régime de pensions du Canada est résilient malgré les turbulences des marchés actuels

trafford Centre Pilot

Podcast : Transition vers l’atteinte de l’objectif zéro émission nette : votre société est-elle prête? Leçons tirées de l’application du cadre d’évaluation des capacités de réduction

dpd 8202 2

Pourquoi Investissements RPC est conçu pour des périodes comme celle-ci

Privacy Preferences
When you visit our website, it may store information through your browser from specific services, usually in form of cookies. Here you can change your privacy preferences. Please note that blocking some types of cookies may impact your experience on our website and the services we offer.